Archive

Archive for the ‘Libraries’ Category

HAPPY NEW YEAR and read all about 2015

December 31, 2015 Leave a comment

Nursery kids July 2015

Wishing all our friends and supporters all the very best for a Happy and Prosperous 2016

Click here to read our 2015 newsletter and find what we have been doing in Uganda

Advertisements

Books winged their way to Uganda via Pelican Post

March 19, 2013 Leave a comment

Our nursery schools have just benefited from a delivery of picture books that were donated by kids from the Blackheath Bluecoat Church of England School in London – the school Rio Ferdinand attended!

Blackheath Bluecoats School

Blackheath Bluecoats School

Edirisa UK has partnered with Pelican Post – a charity that allows people to make a direct contribution to stimulating a culture of reading in an African school by sending books. Books educate and inspire young minds, but throughout schools in Africa, books are in critical short supply. In particular, picture books and early learning story books are unheard of in many schools. The books are all in English but are culturally appropriate for African children.

Nursery Children

Nursery Children

The nursery children have received beautifully illustrated story books like – “We’re going on a Lion Hunt”, “Mama Panye’s Pancakes”, “Handa’s Surprise”.

Story Time

Story Time

We would like to say a big THANK YOU to the children and staff at Blackheath Bluecoat School and Pelican Post for enriching our children’s lives!

Look at this!

Look at this!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

For more information on Pelican Post, please visit http://www.pelican-post.org

 

Head of Nurseries writes about her experience in Kampala

November 9, 2012 Leave a comment

Recently our Head of Nurseries went to Kampala to the Acorns School to see different methods of teaching. Here is her report:

“Thanks very much for having thought of the idea of taking me to an international school. I was happy with them, and they tried their level best to help me achieve what I achieved through discussions with teachers, administrators and taking part in all school activities, including in classrooms as well as outside.

During that time I achieved the following:
– How to deal with water play during teaching and learning
– Sand play when outside
– Story telling by both learners, and teachers by using the available books and stories for them
– How to use and promote ‘Jolly Phonics’ (a book Phionah was given from the school – it includes rhymes/songs to teach each sound in the English language. We’ve photocopied it for each school and Phionah is introducing it to each teacher) in the schools, instead of teaching the alphabet letters.
– How to use time properly by joining break and snack time.
– Library use by all the classes.
– Displaying learners work during learning, rather than putting work made by teachers on walls.
– Teachers to be with learners all the time when at school, including inside and outside activities.
– How to make message books to ease communication between parents, teachers and administrators.

With all the above achievements I am now trying very hard to promote them in all of our schools.  I am even willing to help in the Primary school in the future, as I also visited the primary section of the international school. During the first week I was at Nakasero helping in the Nursery, second week at Bukoto with upper classes. I now have the knowledge on how the children can learn by using the available resources with the help of their teachers, especially on reading and writing.

Being creative

Being creative

This is to inform you that our four nursery schools are now using new methods of teaching and now there is a great change in all our schools.

Bufuka and Kyabahinga:
Now we use circle time instead of standing in lines, they use water play as a method, story telling by both learners and teachers. We joined break and snack time to save time. We use stickers to motivate the learners use of different learning materials in the schools and outside. ‘Jolly Phonics’ includes songs and actions to learn phonetics, and English is the second language, so learners are now trying to speak a little English. Next year children will start using the library and have swimming lessons and we will introduce message books.

Nyakasiru and Ryabirengye:
The schools are also doing well with the same activities because I visited each school to introduce them and my plan is to keep visiting to know what they’ll be doing. At these nurseries volunteers are also taking part because me and Lewis discussed with them, what we need from them and they are happy to take part in all school activities.

In all four schools, children and teachers are busy preparing for the top class graduation by learning songs, games and other activities. Teachers are now happy and working to achieve the best in future with our children.

Also, now teachers teach while in the circle with all the children sitting on mats. That is to say, that teachers are not expected to teach while standing in front of the children. When it is time for writing, drawing or colouring, students sit at the tables and benches.

Thanks very much for the great support towards the development of our nursery schools and I am trying my best to achieve more.”

In the New Year we hope teachers from the Acorns School will visit our nurseries in the Kabale District to help to build on Phionah’s experience.

Circle time outside

Circle time outside

This is a very exciting time for our nursery schools – for teachers and children!

Rubona Community Project

January 16, 2012 1 comment

A Creative Partnership between Edirisa UK, the Rubona Community and Uganda Martyrs University

As a charity working in Uganda there’s nothing more satisfying than watching competent local partners take charge of a project. Of course we love to be at the heart of what we do, but it is so much better to see local people taking ownership of Edirisa initiatives. That’s why we’re so delighted to be working with the faculty of the Built Environment (FOBE) at Uganda Martyrs University (UMU) on the Rubona Community Project. The women in Rubona have always impressed us with their hard-working attitude, constantly searching for innovative new ways to help improve their livelihoods and now we’re also delighted to see young, Ugandan, aspiring architects helping this community. After two visits to Rubona village and many late nights in the studio, the students at UMU presented Edirisa with an impressive portfolio of designs.

Orphanage

Orphanage

Their work was fantastic. They had given us a whole landscape focused around playfulness and creativity. The crafts group at Rubona currently support 22 local orphans in very poor housing so the students made accommodation a priority, giving us the option of a “nuclear family” structure or a dormitory. One thing that really captured our imaginations was that the designs sought – in a prospective plan for 40 orphans – to ensure a semblance of private space for the children and create the feeling of a “home” rather than an institution. Other focuses included a Nursery School (our current nursery functions out of the church) and of course a beautiful crafts workshop as crafts are the glue holding this project together.
Orphanage Unit

Orphanage Unit

Perhaps the most striking thing about the presentations was that the students had really taken this project into their hearts and given us 100%. They had carefully considered what the children at Rubona would need day-to-day: a relaxing environment for rehabilitation, buildings and landscapes that will encourage playfulness after trauma and sustainable solutions that will help the community maintain the buildings.

The concept for involving architecture students in this type of work comes from visiting scholar Marga Jann, who believes that universities house some of the best creative minds in the country and should use them to help the community. She asks the question “why should students be designing a conceptual building in New York that will never be built when they could be helping their communities with their designs?” It’s a great premise and after a successful first semester of work we’re excited to see this project progress next year.

Crafts Workshop

Crafts Workshop

More details and plans will be posted on our website soon so watch this space!

Books for Children

January 3, 2012 Leave a comment

Over 300 Primary Schools in Kabale District received two books with Folktales of Bakiga people

The 2 books

The 2 books

Over the last three years Edirisa  Slovenia has implemented projects with the main goal of improving the reading culture in the Kabale District. Among many other activities they have recently published two books: one for beginners (lower classes) and one for upper classes of Primary School. Both books are written in Rukiga (local language) and English (official language in Uganda).

The reading culture in Uganda is poor and there is a lack of reading materials, especially in local language (which is now included in the school curriculum). Irma and Marta from Edirisa Slovenia have worked hard over the last few years installing libraries in the area and promoting reading with teachers and pupils.

Students from six Secondary Schools in the Kabale District were invited to collect the folk tales. A group of professors and teachers from Kabale selected the best stories. So, everything was done in Kabale; writing, illustrating, printing etc.

Proud Secondary School Students

Proud Secondary School Students

Irma says:

“Both books are great! Teachers and children love them!

We have  proved that good books can be made  in Uganda and that there is no need to only value books which originate in western world.”

This project didn’t only benefit the Primary Schools. Secondary School students collected the folk tales, it was a valuable experience in researching their own culture. When they saw their stories in real books they were extremely proud and happy. Hopefully they will now value their culture and their local language more. The activities of the project will contribute to a better reading culture, better education and so a better life.”

Irma teaching

Irma teaching